Go Places with Books

Building worlds, word by word.

33,025 notes

dodgylogic:

eames-i-am-impressed:

andrysb24:

racethewind10:

latinagabi:

ultrasofts:

missespeon:

missespeon:

Here we go

i feel like i should clarify the guy on the right wrote the article AGAINST misogyny hes not an mra type

he went off in that article too. 

Must read

Seriously must read

READ IT NOW

I just read his article some minutes ago and now saw this picture, I just had a mini heart attack. THIS MAN IS GOLD. Read his article, seriously.

#standing fucking ovation #like #it’s directed at the right people? #in the right voice to get through to them #and i really think this one article could make more of a difference than so many others i’ve read #that were well written and well researched but preaching to the choir #whereas this one #this one is directed at the people that are the fucking problem #and could change minds #god bless you sir (via differentbutnotdissonant)

dodgylogic:

eames-i-am-impressed:

andrysb24:

racethewind10:

latinagabi:

ultrasofts:

missespeon:

missespeon:

Here we go

i feel like i should clarify the guy on the right wrote the article AGAINST misogyny hes not an mra type

he went off in that article too.

Must read

Seriously must read

READ IT NOW

I just read his article some minutes ago and now saw this picture, I just had a mini heart attack. THIS MAN IS GOLD. Read his article, seriously.

#standing fucking ovation #like #it’s directed at the right people? #in the right voice to get through to them #and i really think this one article could make more of a difference than so many others i’ve read #that were well written and well researched but preaching to the choir #whereas this one #this one is directed at the people that are the fucking problem #and could change minds #god bless you sir (via differentbutnotdissonant)

(via seriouslystella)

Filed under arthur chu feminism how men should be

289,564 notes

countfrankula:

i don’t know why everyone makes the grim reaper out to be a bad guy i mean he’s just taking to you to the afterlife it’s not like he killed you it’s actually quite nice of him to walk you there imagine if you had to go alone

Also have u seen the kdrama 49 days? The grim reaper is hot and adorable as fuck.

(Source: dy1anobrien, via moonhippi)

Filed under kdrama lol

91,978 notes

ethiopienne:

beautifullybirdy:

loveandzombies:

This fall, New York City becomes the first city in the nation to tackle the issue of girls’ self-esteem and body image. Recognizing that girls as young as 6 and 7 are struggling with body image and self-esteem, (over 80% of 10-year-old girls are afraid of being fat and by middle school, 40-70% of girls are dissatisfied with two or more parts of their body), New York City is launching a self-esteem initiative to help girls believe their value comes from their character, skills, and attributes – not appearance. 

HOLY SHIT DISABILITY REPRESENTATION IN A MAINSTREAM BODY ACCEPTANCE CAMPAIGN

and girls of color!

(Source: capricornwholovesdanger, via elloellenoh)

Filed under girls representation

167 notes

Anonymous asked: top ten weirdest things that've ever been said to you, as a librarian?

cielrouge:

thelibrarina:

Oh, man. I’m probably forgetting a bunch of them, but here are a few of my favorites:

  1. "Jesus told me to throw away this book."
  2. "You need to get rid of that biography of Lil Wayne because he’s in the Illuminati. He’s a satanist. They’re all satanists, you just have to look online and read about it. Let me tell you about it…"
  3. *hands me a copy of Lord John and the Private Matter* “I think you should know that this book has gay stuff in it.”
  4. "You’re leaving the library? Are you retiring? But you’re only, like, forty!!!!"
  5. [Redacted: Hideously racist comment about how to get “them Muslims” out of “the Iraq”. This was from a coworker.]
  6. "Can you help us print these pictures of the UFO we saw?" [It was definitely Venus.]
  7. "And then I said to my friend, I said, listen my ni…" *librarian death glare* "…inja turtle?"
  8. "Miss Sarah, you should be a mother by now."
  9. "I’m looking for a book that is kind of—" *pauses, covers young daughter’s ears* "—s-e-x-y?"
  10. "I’ll try to come back…someday.” [Said, very sadly, by a little boy who comes in every single week. Including the week after this statement.]

goplaceswithbooks: I imagine you can relate to this XD

Totally legit. I could write a book about the crazies.

Filed under librarians tumblarians sad but true the crazies cielrouge

65,227 notes

stories-yet-to-be-written:

The Best Pictures Of This Year’s Japanese Cherry Blossoms

The Japanese cherry blossom, known as the Sakura in Japanese, is the flower of a cherry tree that is cultivated for its decorative features rather than for cherries (it doesn’t bear fruit). The overwhelming beauty of the cherry blossom bloom has been known and adored for ages. The blooming period is associated with Japanese traditions, culture, aesthetics, and is a bittersweet metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life itself.

The blooming cherry blossoms herald the beginning of the centuries-old Hanami festival – the traditional Japanese custom of picnicking under trees rich with flowering Sakura branches and enjoying this short but striking first breath of spring. The blossoming wave usually starts in Okinawa in January or February and progresses through all of Japan until April or May. The cherry blossom front (Sakura zensen) can be conveniently tracked every year using this calendar.

Source: Demilked Magazine

Breathtaking

(via literarymagpie)

Filed under nature pretty cherry blossom sakura

1,166 notes

chaptervixiv:

yellowxperil:

watchingmedia:

The yellowface of “The Mikado” in your face

Remember when someone pranked a San Francisco TV station into reporting that the names of the Asiana plane crash pilots were “Captain Sum Ting Wong” and “Wi Tu Lo”?

After the station KTVU realized its mistake, it fired three producers.

But in Seattle, at least one theater plans to spend the summer guffawing about how Asian names sound like gibberish.

“The Mikado,” a comic opera, is playing at the Bagley Wright Theatre from July 11 to July 26, produced by the Seattle Gilbert & Sullivan Society.

Set in the fictional Japanese town of Titipu — get it? — the opera features characters named Nanki Poo, Yum-Yum and Pish-Tush. It’s a rom-com where true love is threatened by barbaric beheadings.

All 40 Japanese characters are being played by white actors, including two Latinos. KIRO radio host Dave Ross is in the cast.

It’s yellowface, in your face.

read more: http://seattletimes.com/html/opinion/2024050056_mikadosharonpianchancolumn14xml.html

holy shit!!

We are protesting this!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/707117129324872/?notif_t=group_privacy_change

Seattle folks come together!

Signal boost

(via not-your-cute-little-asian-girl)

Filed under yellow face racism media fuck this shit

67,291 notes

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.

His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.

He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.

He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.

Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.

It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

(via leeandlow)

Filed under asian history ww2 badass asians you can be sure hollywood will never make a movie abt him so read up here

12,150 notes

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany
The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany

The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

(via kceyagi)

Filed under stem women science pocwomen

14,791 notes

We live in a society that’s sexist in ways it doesn’t understand. One of the consequences is that men are extremely sensitive to being criticized by women. I think it threatens them in a very primal way, and male privilege makes them feel free to lash out.

This is why women are socialized to carefully dance around these issues, disagreeing with men in an extremely gentle manner. Not because women are nicer creatures than men. But because our very survival can depend on it.

No skin thick enough: The daily harassment of women in the game industry

The whole article sadly hits very close to home.

(via rosalarian)

(via seriouslystella)

Filed under misogyny patriarchy sexism